FDA Approves Polarizing First Drug for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

On Monday morning, the FDA controversially approved the first drug for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Read more on how the drug works and what impact this will have in healthcare and medicine!

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Last Week in Science (9/4-9/10)

First Alzheimer’s treatment, sickle-cell gene therapy and more!

Update on CRISPR: Closer to human trials?

Remember when we talked about CRISPR a little over a month ago? And we dreamt of the positive impact it could have on humans in the future? Well, dream no more–that day may be much sooner than we expected.

CRISPR: The Future of Science is Here

CRISPR, the latest genome-editing technology, has been making the headlines in almost every major science journal, heralding a “new era” for science. Why is CRISPR such a big deal? Better yet, what is CRISPR?

Are Superheroes Among Us?

As we all remember from 8th grade biology, Gregor Mendel is known as the “father of modern genetics.” Mendel’s experiments with pea plants made him realize that there are certain genetic traits (he was testing pea size, shape, color, etc.) that get passed down to the offspring. This inheritance of genetic traits is based on…

The Evolution of Medicine and Where We’re Headed in the Future

Hippocrates, the “Father of Western Medicine,” is arguably one of the most iconic physicians in history. Born in 460 BC, his influence has been long-lasting and far-reaching; in fact, medical students today recite the “Hippocratic Oath” to ensure that as future physicians, they understand the significance and seriousness of taking on the role of being…

Genetic Counseling Central in Clinical Genomics

As broader, more accurate genetic tests reach the market, Certified Genetic Counselors (CGC) will remain an important part of the process of delivering this information to the patient. Genomics isn’t solely about genetic testing, it’s about understanding and contextualizing all hereditary information available for a patient in order to better understand their health.This includes genotype,…

New Rules Empower Patients to Access Data

Have you heard of the new rules requiring labs to provide test results directly to patients? Here is a brief summary of the new rules: the order, issued by the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services (HHS), amends the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Act (CLIA) to…

FH Awareness Day

Today is Familial hypercholesterolemia, or FH, awareness day. FH is a hereditary disease that leads to early and aggressive heart-issues for the sufferer. Nearly 1 in 200-500 people in the United States have FH, but it is suspected that only 10% of cases are diagnosed. Currently, family history of early cardiac events and high-cholesterol are…

Advances in Alzheimer’s Prevention Made Possible by Genomics

In 2013, more than 5 million people in the United States were living with Alzheimer’s disease. That number is expected to triple by 2050. Alzheimer’s is the most common form of dementia, and can be an emotional drain on family members of those affected. Treatments can slow or delay symptoms, but there is no known…

Genomics Hinges on Education

Last week I made the case for more education in genomics for nurses, but it’s just as important to educate non-healthcare professionals. Doctors and non-doctors alike are largely unaware of the power current genomic technology has to change how diagnoses are reached and treatments administered. Progress is being made, but there are still hurdles to…

Is Cancer Overdiagnosed?

There is a growing debate in healthcare, spurred by an advisory panel for National Cancer Institute, that says cancer is being over-diagnosed. There is no doubt that early-detection of cancer has saved lives, especially for the more aggressive varieties. The argument goes that early-detection screenings have become more widespread, but doctors still aren’t catching a…